Toyota: My How Time Flies

Five years ago Toyota Motor Company was at the peak of a crisis over unintended acceleration.  The chairman, Akido Toyoda, testified and apologized at a Congressional hearing.  It was a very, very low point for a company that had overtaken Ford a the maker of the most popular model in the world, the Toyota Camry.

This week, Toyota started production of their new fuel cell vehicle, the Mirai (Japanese for “future”).

The dates are not coincidental.  Back in 2010, pundits and even people who get held accountable thought Toyota would never be the same.

But not for these reasons.  Logically, they figured the scandal would leave a lasting mark with consumers.  It didn’t–which the hundreds of thousands of people employed directly by Toyota and indirectly by vendors is quite glad about.

Five years later, Toyota is now mass producing the first fuel cell sedan bound for Japanese showrooms now, and US showrooms in 2016.  The Mirai is being manufactured at Toyota’s Motomachi plant.  Recently the plant churned out Lexus LFA’s.  In operation since 1959, Motomachi has built many of the marque’s finest vehicles.  The Supra, Corona, Publica and other historic models were produced at there as well.

</>

</>
To mark the event, as well as invite the public into the making of this historic new vehicle, Toyota christened a series of videos on the assembly line process.  The view above are comments from Akio Toyoda prior to the launch.  Below are vids on each major stage of the assembly process.

</>

</>
Mirai production line, plant interior and parts selection: The assembly line for the Toyota Mirai is divided into three main sections: trim, chassis/fuel cell assembly, and final assembly. In each section, there are sub-assembly areas for parts installation. This video shows an overview of the production line as well as the parts selection process located close to the assembly line.

</>

</>
Mirai production line, vehicle trim: Before each Toyota Mirai body is brought to the former LFA Works assembly line, it is painted at the mass production line at Motomachi Plant. The vehicle doors are then removed to enable more efficient interior work for Toyota’s highly skilled craftspeople, as well as preventing doors from being damaged. This video also showcases: wire harness, dash silencer, brake fluid tank, rear combination lamp, instrument panel, main battery, roof lining, and rear bumper installation.

</> 

 </>

Mirai production line, final assembly: The final processes before the Toyota Mirai fuel cell sedan rolls off the assembly line are the installation and assembly of the external power supply system, vehicle interior, engine bay, windshield, and rear windows. The glue used to affix the windows to the frame is 8 mm high and 12 mm wide, applied by a highly skilled craftsperson at a consistent rate. This video also features the final interior trim installations, including: seats, doors, steering wheel and inverter cover. An ignition check is then performed on the vehicle before it is send for final inspection.

 </>

 </>
Mirai production line, quality control and inspection: Detailed quality control and inspection is performed on the Toyota Mirai before it leaves the Motomachi Plant, on its way to customers. Toyota specialists use both visual and tactile inspection to ensure the vehicle is of the highest quality and without any defect before leaving the factory.

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 Hybrid and Electric Car News

Comments

comments

Sebastian James

sabbadoo32@gmail.com

Accept no substitutes

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Paste your AdWords Remarketing code here